Rabies in the United States icon

Rabies in the United States

Every year, between 16,000 and 39,000 people come in contact with potentially rabid animals in the United States and receive rabies postexposure prophylaxis (PEP).1,2 Wild animals were the carriers of rabies in 92% of cases reported in 2013.1

Rabies is found across the country. Find out what you and your patients need to know about rabies in your area. Click on your state on the interactive map to learn what animals are rabies carriers where you live.

Select a state to learn about rabies in that area

United States Rabies MapEast Coast Central west az-ca-nm-tx Alaska Puerto Rico

East Coast

On the east coast the most common carriers of rabies are raccoons, skunks, and bats. Foxes also account for some cases of rabies on the east coast, as well as cats, and in some cases, dogs.1

Warn your patients that they should never touch or feed wild animals and to avoid contact with unfamiliar dogs and cats to avoid risk of rabies infection. If you or your patients see an animal acting unusually vicious and aggressive, or if the animal is acting strangely or is having trouble walking, immediately report the animal to local animal control.2,3

Raccoons with Rabies

Raccoons

Skunks with Rabies

Skunks

Bats with Rabies

Bats

Central United States and West Coast

For most of the United States, the most common carriers of rabies are skunks. Bats also account for cases of rabies in the middle states of the country as well as some cats and dogs.1

Warn your patients that they should never touch or feed wild animals and to avoid contact with unfamiliar dogs and cats to avoid risk of rabies infection. If you or your patients see an animal acting unusually vicious and aggressive, or if the animal is acting strangely or is having trouble walking, immediately report the animal to local animal control.2,3

Skunks with Rabies

Skunks

Bats with Rabies

Bats

Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas

Skunks are one of the main carriers of rabies in Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas. However, foxes are also of concern in areas of Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. As is the case across the United States, bats and some cats and dogs can also carry rabies in this region and caution should be exercised if you come in contact with any of these animals.1

Warn your patients that they should never touch or feed wild animals and to avoid contact with unfamiliar dogs and cats to avoid risk of rabies infection. If you or your patients see an animal acting unusually vicious and aggressive, or if the animal is acting strangely or is having trouble walking, immediately report the animal to local animal control.2,3

Skunks with Rabies

Skunks

Raccoons with Rabies

Foxes

Bats with Rabies

Bats

Alaska

In Alaska, Artic foxes present the greatest rabies risk.1

Warn your patients that they should never touch or feed wild animals and to avoid contact with unfamiliar dogs and cats to avoid risk of rabies infection. If you or your patients see an animal acting unusually vicious and aggressive, or if the animal is acting strangely or is having trouble walking, immediately report the animal to local animal control.2,3

Arctic Foxes with Rabies

Arctic Foxes

Puerto Rico

The mongoose is the most common carrier of rabies in Puerto Rico. Dogs can also pose a threat.1

Warn your patients that they should never touch or feed wild animals and to avoid contact with unfamiliar dogs and cats to avoid risk of rabies infection. If you or your patients see an animal acting unusually vicious and aggressive, or if the animal is acting strangely or is having trouble walking, immediately report the animal to local animal control.2,3

Mongooses with Rabies

Mongooses

Select a state to learn about rabies in that area

East Coast

United States Rabies Map

On the east coast the most common carriers of rabies are raccoons, skunks, and bats. Foxes also account for some cases of rabies on the east coast, as well as cats, and in some cases, dogs.1

Warn your patients that they should never touch or feed wild animals and to avoid contact with unfamiliar dogs and cats to avoid risk of rabies infection. If you or your patients see an animal acting unusually vicious and aggressive, or if the animal is acting strangely or is having trouble walking, immediately report the animal to local animal control.2,3

Raccoons with Rabies

Raccoons

Skunks with Rabies

Skunks

Bats with Rabies

Bats

Central United States and West Coast

United States Rabies Map

For most of the United States, the most common carriers of rabies are skunks. Bats also account for cases of rabies in the middle states of the country as well as some cats and dogs.1

Warn your patients that they should never touch or feed wild animals and to avoid contact with unfamiliar dogs and cats to avoid risk of rabies infection. If you or your patients see an animal acting unusually vicious and aggressive, or if the animal is acting strangely or is having trouble walking, immediately report the animal to local animal control.2,3

Skunks with Rabies

Skunks

Bats with Rabies

Bats

Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas

United States Rabies Map

Skunks are one of the main carriers of rabies in Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas. However foxes are also of concern in areas of Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. As is the case across the U.S., bats and some cats and dogs can also carry rabies in this region and caution should be exercised if you come in contact with any of these animals.1

Warn your patients that they should never touch or feed wild animals and to avoid contact with unfamiliar dogs and cats to avoid risk of rabies infection. If you or your patients see an animal acting unusually vicious and aggressive, or if the animal is acting strangely or is having trouble walking, immediately report the animal to local animal control.2,3

Skunks with Rabies

Skunks

Raccoons with Rabies

Foxes

Bats with Rabies

Bats

Alaska

United States Rabies Map

In Alaska, Artic foxes present the greatest rabies risk.1

Warn your patients that they should never touch or feed wild animals and to avoid contact with unfamiliar dogs and cats to avoid risk of rabies infection. If you or your patients see an animal acting unusually vicious and aggressive, or if the animal is acting strangely or is having trouble walking, immediately report the animal to local animal control.2,3

Arctic Foxes with Rabies

Arctic Foxes

Puerto Rico

United States Rabies Map

The mongoose is the most common carrier of rabies in Puerto Rico. Dogs can also pose a threat.1

Warn your patients that they should never touch or feed wild animals and to avoid contact with unfamiliar dogs and cats to avoid risk of rabies infection. If you or your patients see an animal acting unusually vicious and aggressive, or if the animal is acting strangely or is having trouble walking, immediately report the animal to local animal control.2,3

Mongooses with Rabies

Mongooses

 

Rabies vaccine and HyperRAB® S/D (rabies immune globulin [human]) should be given to all persons suspected of exposure to rabies with one exception: persons who have been previously immunized with rabies vaccine and have a confirmed adequate rabies antibody titer should receive only vaccine. HyperRAB S/D should be administered as promptly as possible after exposure, but can be administered up to the eighth day after the first dose of vaccine is given.

HyperRAB S/D should be given with caution to patients with a history of prior systemic allergic reactions following the administration of human immunoglobulin preparations.

The attending physician who wishes to administer HyperRAB S/D to persons with isolated immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency must weigh the benefits of immunization against the potential risks of hypersensitivity reactions. Such persons have increased potential for developing antibodies to IgA and could have anaphylactic reactions to subsequent administration of blood products that contain IgA.

As with all preparations administered by the intramuscular route, bleeding complications may be encountered in patients with thrombocytopenia or other bleeding disorders.

Soreness at the site of injection and mild temperature elevations may be observed at times. Sensitization to repeated injections has occurred occasionally in immunoglobulin-deficient patients. Angioneurotic edema, skin rash, nephrotic syndrome, and anaphylactic shock have rarely been reported after intramuscular injection so that a causal relationship between immunoglobulin and these reactions is not clear.

Administration of live virus vaccines (e.g., MMR) should be deferred for approximately 3 months after rabies immune globulin (human) administration.

HyperRAB S/D is made from human plasma. Products made from human plasma may contain infectious agents, such as viruses, and, theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent that can cause disease. There is also the possibility that unknown infectious agents may be present in such products.

Please see HyperRAB S/D full Prescribing Information for complete prescribing details.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

HyperTET® S/D (tetanus immune globulin [human]) is indicated for prophylaxis against tetanus following injury in patients whose immunization is incomplete or uncertain.

HyperTET S/D should be given with caution to patients with a history of prior systemic allergic reactions following the administration of human immunoglobulin preparations.

In patients who have severe thrombocytopenia or any coagulation disorder that would contraindicate intramuscular injections, HyperTET S/D should be given only if the expected benefits outweigh the risks.

Slight soreness at the site of injection and slight temperature elevation may be noted at times. Sensitization to repeated injections of human immunoglobulin is extremely rare. In the course of routine injections of large numbers of persons with immunoglobulin, there have been a few isolated occurrences of angioneurotic edema, nephrotic syndrome, and anaphylactic shock after injection. Administration of live virus vaccines (eg, MMR) should be deferred for approximately 3 months after tetanus immune globulin (human) administration.

HyperTET S/D is made from human plasma. Products made from human plasma may contain infectious agents, such as viruses and theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent that can cause disease. There is also the possibility that unknown infectious agents may be present in such products.

Please see HyperTET S/D full Prescribing Information for complete prescribing details.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


References:

  1. Dyer JL, Yager P, Orciari L, et al. Rabies surveillance in the United States during 2013. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2014;245(10):1111-1123.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Clinical signs of rabies in animals. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. http://www.cdc.gov/rabies/specific_groups/veterinarians/clinical_signs.html. Updated April 22, 2011. Accessed March 25, 2016.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How can you prevent rabies in people? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. http://www.cdc.gov/rabies/prevention/people.html. Updated March 23, 2016. Accessed March 25, 2016.